HoloLens will run up to 5.5 hours on a single charge, Microsoft says

In addition, the HoloLens will be able to connect to any device over Wi-Fi or Bluetooth and run any universal Windows 10 app, according to a Microsoft rep.

microsoft hololens project xray demo2

Microsoft's Project XRay experimental game showed how HoloLens could create spatially aware games that react to your environment. 

There’s a lot we know about the HoloLens, Microsoft’s upcoming augmented reality headset. There’s also a lot we don’t know about it, but a new report fills in some of the remaining blanks regarding battery life, connectivity, and app compatibility.

While speaking at an event in Tel Aviv, Microsoft Technical Evangelist Bruce Harris stated that the HoloLens’s battery will run between 2.5 and 5.5 hours between charges, depending on the task, according to Petri’s Brad Sams. Harris also told the crowd that the HoloLens will be able connect to just about any Wi-Fi- or Bluetooth-equipped device.

In addition, Harris explained that the HoloLens will be able to run any universal Windows 10 app, and said that the viewable area is similar in size to what you’d get if you held a 15-inch screen two feet from your face.

That field of view is in line with what IDG News Service’s Blair Hanley Frank experienced when he got to try the HoloLens last summer. Previously, a Microsoft rep told Frank that it had limited the HoloLens field of view to keep your peripheral vision clear, but according to Sams’s report, the limitation exists “because of cost and battery-life.” 

Things should improve over time, though: Harris told the crowd that Microsoft hopes to widen the HoloLens’s field of view in the future as manufacturing capabilities and costs permit, Sams notes.

Despite these new nuggets of information, we still don’t know when you’ll be able to run out and buy a HoloLens, but developer kits should arrive at some point in the first quarter of this year.

This story, "HoloLens will run up to 5.5 hours on a single charge, Microsoft says" was originally published by PCWorld.